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Coirn na hEireann

Coirn na hEireann

Horns of Ancient Ireland - Early in 1994, The National Museum of Ireland was completing a new exhibition dedicated to ancient and prehistoric Ireland.  A number of Bronze Age horns and crotals from the great Irish collection were to be included.  Ancient Music Ireland was requested to play and record eight original horns from locations around Ireland so that sample sounds of the instruments could be supplied to the public as part of the display.  Bearing in mind the unique aspect...

Horns of Ancient Ireland - Early in 1994, The National Museum of Ireland was completing a new exhibition dedicated to ancient and prehistoric Ireland.  A number of Bronze Age horns and crotals from the great Irish collection were to be included.  Ancient Music Ireland was requested to play and record eight original horns from locations around Ireland so that sample sounds of the instruments could be supplied to the public as part of the display.  Bearing in mind the unique aspect of the proposal, it was decided to employ expert sound engineer, Rod Callan to make the recordings.  

  As the Museum would not permit original horns to be taken out of the building an area was made available adjoining the Treasury Room for a total of three hours. Temporary mouthpieces were made for three end blown horns which were incomplete and it was decided not to attempt to play one of the side-blown examples due to the amount of corrosion and its overall fragility.  Each instrument was played in a number of variations including bending notes, repeated rhythms, sound alteration and simple fundamentals.  The sounds were recorded using up to date digital equipment and the space had a good acoustic though occasionally a particular sample would have to be repeated if the 46A bus passed by outside!  A single crotal was also included in the sample recordings.  These were brought to ‘The Works Studio’ at Landsowne Road in Dublin where individual sounds could be catalogued and some over tracking attempted.  To facilitate this, a click track had been employed during recording. To allow for subsequent looping and overlaying.  This time in the studio was particularly exciting where t was realised how rich the voices of the horns were and how well they worked together in groups.  Probably the most important discovery was the presence of overtones in the sounds.   The large end-blown horn from Kerry (A) was looped to create a continuous drone.  This was then over tracked three times.  The intention was to create a rich fundamental foundation to which higher side blown sounds could be added.  To every one’s surprise when the sound was played back over the studio speaker a series of higher notes were clearly audible and even pronounced in the recording.  This was the first occasion when overtones were detected as an unequal part of the voice of an Irish Bronze Age horn.     Though there can be no certainty as to how horns were played in their own time, the properties and designs do appear to favour tone alteration and enrichment.  This startling discovery ultimately led to the release of the album ‘Overtone – Ancient Music of Ireland’ in 209 and has dramatically influenced the ways in which reproduction horns are interpreted in their own right and as accompaniment to other instruments. The recordings of seven original Irish Bronze Ag horns remain the only examples in existence.  Any future playing will not be allowed due to the invasive nature of physically holding and blowing and the strength and vibration of the sounds generated by the horns.  Yet these recordings did capture the musical nature of the ancient instruments and almost certainly reflect much of the sound that they were designed to produce at the behest of an accomplished musician.  The online shop allows the purchase of groups of sound samples featuring each horn for €0.15 cent each.  e.g. tracks 5 to 9 feature Horn A - large end-blown from Clogherclemin, Co. Kerry. Ancient Music Ireland would like to thank Dr. Patrick E. Wallace (former Director), Dr. Eamonn Kelly, Keeper of Antiquities and all the staff of the National Museum of Ireland for their help in facilitating these recordings and for the vital work they do to ensure that the rich ancient musical heritage of Ireland is preserved for future generations.  These recordings are dedicated to the memory of Robert Ball who died following an attempt to play an Irish Bronze Age horn in 1857 AD.

www.ancientmusicireland.com/photos/coirn-na-hireann-horns-of-ancient-ireland-18.html Ancient Music Ireland would like to thank Dr. Patrick E. Wallace (former Director), Dr. Eamonn Kelly, Keeper of Antiquities and all the staff of the National Museum of Ireland for their help in facilitating these recordings and for the vital work they do to ensure that the rich ancient musical heritage of Ireland is preserved for future generations.  These recordings are dedicated to the memory of Robert Ball who died following an attempt to play an Irish Bronze Age horn in 1857 AD.   All the original Bronze Age horns are played by: Simon O’Dwyer Assistant : Maria Cullen O’Dwyer Recording and mastering engineer: Rod Callan Click track operator: Steve Belton Photographs: Simon O’Dwyer   Mastered and post-mastered at The Works Studios, Lansdowne Road, Dublin 4, Ireland. Feb 1994. Cover design: Image Now Consultants. All rights reserved. 1994 © 

'Horn A'  - The largest end-blown horn was found at Clogherclemin, Co. Kerry.  The mouthpiece was not found with the instrument.  A temporary mouthpiece was used for the recordings.  'Horn B' - This side-blown horn was found at Chute Hall, Co. Kerry had been roughly repaired at some stage in the past.  A cap similar to that of 'Horn D' is missing and a large lump of clay blocks the end.  This horn, therefore did not play it's true note. ‘Horn C’ – A magnificent side-blown horn from North Eastern Ireland.  The line and zig zag design is quite common on instruments from this area. ‘Horn D’ Found at Derrynane, Co. Kerry, this is the largest of the side-blown horns.  It is also the lightest casting being so fine as to make one think it was fabricated from sheet bronze.  A welding repair is quite visible at the mouthpiece. ‘Horn E’ – From Drunkendult, Co. Antrim, this delightful little side-blown horn is in the best condition of the all the horns included in this album.  It is so clean as to suggest that it was made one hundred years ago, not to mention two thousand eight hundred years ago! 'Horn F' - Though there is quite a distinctive design variation between Northern and Southern horns, this small end-blown horn from Roscrea has elements of both regions in it’s design and yet it is different in that it is quite a heavy instrument.  Possibly this is one of the older horns.  As with ‘Horn A’, it was found without a mouthpiece.  ‘Horn G’ -  It is not known where in Ireland many of the Bronze Age horns come from.  This incomplete end-blown is one such instrument.  When fitted with a temporary mouthpiece it was a joy to play and particularly lent itself to rhythm drone. ‘Horn H’ – An obvious side-blown pair to ‘Horn G’, it was decided on the day of the recordings that this horn was a little too delicate and corroded to risk further damage by attempting to play it.    

1 Woodlands Reel READ MORE 1:56 4.61 MB 0.70 €
2 Slippery Slide READ MORE 1:10 1.88 MB 0.70 €
3 Horn Overtone Singing READ MORE 3:36 8.46 MB 0.70 €
4 Along the Shore READ MORE 4:05 9.51 MB 0.70 €
     
01  Woodlands Reel, 1:56 min
This is a simple reel which through the combination and relative tones achieves a rich melodious result.  Please see Coirn na hÉireann in the photos section of this website to see photographs of the original instruments from the National Museum of Ireland used on this album.  This track was recorded on 'HornsG, A, E and F'   ©
02  Slippery Slide, 1:10 min
This tune calls upon the playing techniques employed by Aboriginal Australian didgeridoo players to create a fast pulsing effect rhrough changing tone and the use of an Irish tradition (slide) rhythm base.  Please see Coirn na hÉireann in the photos section of this website to see photographs of the original instruments from the National Museum of Ireland used on this album.  This track was recorded on 'Horn A'.   ©
03  Horn Overtone Singing, 3:36 min
Three tracks of the base fundamental of the longest end-blown horn are looped whereupon a series of overtones become prominently audible in the sound.  A single crotal gives the resulting rich sound a light delicacy. Please see Coirn na hÉireann in the photos section of this website to see photographs of the original instruments from the National Museum of Ireland used on this album.  This track was recorded on 'Horn A'  x 3 and a crotal. ©
04  Along the Shore, 4:05 min
A remarkable combination of pulsing rhythm and sweet tone relatives is achieved in this tune.  The overall tune has a distinctive modern dance flavour with great power and presence.  If the listener did not know that the instruments were 3,000 years old they could not be blamed for thinking that the sounds were coming from a much more recent source.  This track is also included in the 'Overtone' album for followers of our work that have already pruchased that album.  Please see Coirn na hÉireann in the photos section of this website to see aphotographs of the original instruments from the National Museum of Ireland used on this album.  This track was recorded on 'Horn A'.   ©  P.S. this track features on our YouTube clip!

 
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